Lifestyle choices essay

Maximizers are less happy in life, perhaps due to their obsession with making optimal choices in a society where people are frequently confronted with choice. [22] One study found that maximizers reported significantly less life satisfaction, happiness, optimism, and self-esteem, and significantly more regret and depression, than did satisficers. In regards to buying products, maximizers were less satisfied with consumer decisions and were more regretful. They were also more likely to engage in social comparison, where they analyze their relative social standing among their peers, and to be more affected by social comparisons in which others appeared to be in higher standing than them. For example, maximizers who saw their peer solve puzzles faster than themselves expressed greater doubt about their own abilities and showed a larger increase in negative mood. [23] On the other hand, people who refrain from taking better choices through drugs or other forms of escapism tend to be much happier in life.

There's a sad letter on my website forum, from a 40-year-old father of two who wonders if he should leave a marriage in which he enjoys very little sex. He has averaged times a year for the previous decade. Oh yes, he's been counting! But he is also unhappy that he receives little affection or intimacy of any kind. ''Should I stay or should I go?'' he asked. He received 163 responses, mainly from men. They debated the cost of losing his family versus spending the rest of his life starved for physical love. Most argued he should leave.

Lifestyle choices essay

lifestyle choices essay

Media:

lifestyle choices essaylifestyle choices essaylifestyle choices essaylifestyle choices essay